Tuesday, December 15, 2020

Ginger Snaps

 1 cup packed brown sugar

3/4 cup Vegetable Oil

1/4 cup Molasses

1 egg

2 cups white flour

2 t Baking Soda

1/4 t Salt

1/2 t ground cloves

1 t ground Cinnamon

1 t ground ginger

1/3 cup white sugar for decoration

Step 1. preheat oven to 375 deg F

Step 2. In a large bowl, mix together the brown sugar, oil, molasses, and egg. Combine the flour, baking soda, salt, cloves, cinnamon, and ginger; stir into the molasses mixture. Roll dough into 1 1/4 inch balls. Roll each ball in white sugar before placing 2 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheets.

Step 3. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes in preheated oven, or until center is firm. Cool on wire racks.

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Chocolate Pie (Cheryl Gabel)


*   12.3 oz silken or firm tofu
 *   1 tsp cocoa powder
 *   1 tsp pure vanilla extract
 *   2 tablespoons milk of choice
 *   scant 1/8 tsp salt
 *   8 to 10 oz chocolate chips (a little over 1 and 1/3c or more)
 *   2-3 tablespoons agave or other sweetener

Melt the chocolate (either on the stove or in the microwave), then throw everything into a blender or food processor and blend until super-smooth. Pour into a pie crust if desired. Fridge until chilled.

Dream Bars (Brandon Gabel)

1 - 14oz Can Coconut Milk
2/3 cup Brown Sugar
2 cups Graham Cracker Crumbs
1/2 cup Melted non-hydrogenated Margarine
1 bag or 1.5 cups of Chocolate chips or chunks
2 cups Flaked Sweetened Coconut
1 cup Walnuts, chopped

In a large saucepan, whisk together the coconut milk and brown sugar over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. The mixture may form a thin skin on the surface; just stir it back into the liquid. Remove the mixture from the heat and let it cool while preparing the crust. 

Preheat oven to 350 deg F. Line a 13x9 inch baking pan with parchment paper. In a large bowl, combine the rest of the ingredients. Firmly press the mixture into the prepared pan, pressing evenly from the center to the sides of the pan. 

Pour the warm coconut milk mixture evenly over crumb base. Banke for 28-30 minutes or until coconut is deeply golden and the filling is bubbling. Remove the pan from the oven and let it cool on a wire rack. Transfer the pan to the refrigerator to completely cool and firm up the bars for at least 4 hours or overnight in the fridge until very firm. Run a knife along the edges and slide the bars on it parchment paper out of the pan and onto a cutting board. Then slice into 24 squares. These bars freeze well.

Monday, April 1, 2013

College Place Walmart, to Close on Friday Night, Saturday


     Following pressure from other businesses in the City of College Place, the venerable Walmart has decided to follow suit and close its doors Friday afternoon, to reopen on Saturday evening. College Place, built around the Seventh-day Adventist Institution, Walla Walla University, has been long known for businesses closing their doors on the Adventist Sabbath. While other unique aspects of the town, such as the difficulty in finding a caffeinated soda or beef jerky have faded, Saturday now seems to have gained some traction.

"It gives our facilities a chance to rest," says Store Manager, Warren Wimple. "We also didn't feel that it was fair to other businesses in the area. Besides when you look at the recent economic climate, keeping our store open 24 hours and 7 days a week has become a luxury." We interviewed a local businessman, who preferred to be called Andy. He had this to say, "This is a strongly positive and unexpected step for a large company like Walmart. We praise their actions to keep College Place as free of distractions as possible while people should be in church."

Many of those we interviewed were incredulous, "What a crock!" said Mr. McDonald panhandling in front of the store. "What am I supposed to do? Hold my sign in the church parking lot? Are you kidding?" 

Despite several angry responses Mr. Wimple responds, "customers will have to prepare for the weekend on Friday or wait until after sundown." 

Saturday, January 19, 2013

Apple Cinnamon Muffins (Mariel Higgins)


2 cups all purpose flour 
1 cup whole wheat flour
4 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 tbsp cinnamon
1 tsp nutmeg

1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 tbsp coconut oil, melted
1 cup applesauce
1 cup soy milk
2 apples, diced

combine dry ingredients
mix oils, applesauce and milk and add to dry ingredients
stir in chopped apples
fill muffin tins (makes 24 muffins) and bake at 400 degrees for 20 minutes

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Wireless Power Transmission

After I got a hold of an Braun Electric toothbrush, the concept of inductive power coupling has intrigued me. The charger connection is completely insulated. The toothbrush has a hole on the bottom that mates with a small cylinder sticking out of the charger. (PICTURE)

To check out the effect I took a coil of wire wrapped around a plastic spool and set it on top of the charger. I obtained approximately 1.5V open circuit and 500mA short circuit. I couldn't get too near the cylinder so the coupling wasn't the best. (PICTURE)

Next, I cut a 120V to 12V E shaped core "filament transformer" about the size of my fist in half, to produce two separated E shaped iron cores. Cutting through all the copper windings, paper and iron core made a real mess, took a lot of time to cut and dulled my hack saw. I used a vice to keep the core slices from separating.

I next wound the core with about 200 wraps of transformer wire I got at Radio Shack (I used the entire spool however many wraps that was). Clear plastic tape was used to keep the windings in place. I used a small piece of 220 grit sandpaper to take the enamel off the ends of the wire. I checked the inductance with my wavetek multimeter and it showed .3 mH. The resistance showed 3.3 ohm. The reason I am worried about this is that I don't have extra 20A fuses for my meter and I want to get an estimate of the quiescent current of my transformer without blowing up my circuit breaker, my meter and myself.

A little math (determine impedance from resistance and inductance): V = I Z => I = V / Z

Z =R + jwL =R + j * 2 * pi * f * L =R + j * 6.28 * 60 * .0003 =3.3 + .11304j

I = 120 / (3.3 + .11304j) = 40A

This doesn't look good for my meter fuse or my breaker!

After further thought about the way a transformer works and electric versus magnetic circuits I determined the following.

The small quiescent current of a power transformer is a function of the reverse magnetic field produced by the voltage impressed on the secondary windings and not on the inherent impedance of the coil. When the magnetic field is broken (with an air gap) in a transformer it behaves like a shorted secondary and draws potentially lots and lots of current.

For this to really work well, a higher frequency should be used. I'm curious what my toothbrush uses.

Breakthrough discovery! I just hooked up my handy dandy yet old as dirt Freq Counter to that inductive coil and viola! 21 kHz and change.

I need a higher frequency source than 60Hz. I have a function generator, but it tops out under a single Watt power output and has a 50 ohm output impedance. Higher impedance means more coil wraps... no good. I discovered that an old audio amp I have laying around will put out 50W up to 70kHz at 8 ohm output impedance. I think I will choose 20 kHz however. Higher frequencies may cause extra loss in the rectification process later. The coil inductance that I need to produce more than 8 ohms of impedance at 20 kHz. More Math: Z = j*2*pi*f*L Z = 8j ohms L = Z/(2*pi*f) f = frequency = 20,000 Hz pi = 3.14 L = 64uH This is definitely more reasonable. In fact I may try and wind this around a plastic core.

How ESN's Work

ESN's are an 8 digit hexidecimal number or an 11 digit decimal number. Either one represents a 32 bit binary value.

Keep in mind that one digit of HEX equals 4 binary bits.

Manufacturer IDSerial Number
HEX0-F0-F0-F0-F0-F0-F0-F0-F
BINXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
DEC0-25500000000-16777215


For example:
ESN HEX: E6 9F FF FF

The Manufacturer Code is E6 (hex) or 230 (dec).

The Serial Number is 9F FF FF (hex) or 10485759 (dec).

So the decimal ESN is: 23010485759

Conversely, for decimal ESN: 23010485759

The Manufacturer Code is 230 (dec) or E6(hex).

The Serial Number is 10485759 (dec) or 9F FF FF (hex).

So the hex ESN is: E6 9F FF FF